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Crossroads Radio Show Annual Calendar

Crossroads Radio Show Annual Calendar

JANUARY 16, 2018 - BROKEN TRAIL OF DREAMS DACA (DEFERRED ACTION FOR CHILDHOOD ARRIVALS) IMMIGRANT CHILDREN'S DREAMS ARE IN LIMBOJANUARY 16, 2018 - BROKEN TRAIL OF DREAMS  DACA (DEFERRED ACTION FOR CHILDHOOD ARRIVALS)  IMMIGRANT CHILDREN'S DREAMS ARE IN LIMBOTHE RADIO SHOW FOR TODAY WAS ENTITLED: BROKEN TRAIL OF DREAMS - DACA - (DEFERRED ACTION FOR CHILDHOOD ARRIVALS) IMMIGRANT CHILDREN'S DREAMS ARE IN LIMBO. THE GUESTS FOR TODAY'S SHOW WERE: TED LOZA, COMMUNITY ACTIVIST, POLITICAL & PUBLIC RELATIONS CONSULTANT AND ILSY MARILYN, DACA ADVOCATE. COMMENTARY BY MERTINE MOORE BROWN: Blind Stan offers this unique piece of advice: Education, entertainment and therapy are all together. Ted Loza adds that this all evolves into one word: Family. Undocumented immigrants have contributed $11b to the economy. Most are law abiding citizens and pay taxes. We need to be careful how we spend our money. There is power in numbers. Families are being torn apart from these deportations. The African American community has already been affected. With men out of the community, boys don't know they are boys and girls don't know how to be girls.
January 9, 2018 - CAN EXPANDING "SAFE STREETS" HALT BALTIMORE'S VIOLENCE ?January 9, 2018 - CAN EXPANDING "SAFE STREETS" HALT BALTIMORE'S VIOLENCE ?The radio show for this day was entitled: CAN EXPANDING "SAFE STREETS" HALT BALTIMORE'S VIOLENCE ? THE GUEST WAS EDDIE CONWAY, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF THE REAL NEWS.COM AND FORMER BLACK PANTHER POLITICAL PRISONER SERVED 43 YEARS MARYLAND PRISON SYSTEM BALTIMORE NATIVE.
January 2, 2018 - FIRST HOUR: DC'S NOTORIOUS LGBT STREET GANG HAS A NEW AGENDA ? SECOND HOUR: GOING DOWN MEMORY LANE DC IN THE 60s, 70s, 80s January 2, 2018  -  FIRST HOUR:  DC'S NOTORIOUS LGBT STREET GANG HAS A NEW AGENDA ? SECOND HOUR:  GOING DOWN MEMORY LANE DC IN THE 60s, 70s, 80s JOIN OUR LIVE RADIO BREAKFAST SHOW! BEN'S CHILI BOWL 1213 U STREET, NW WASHINGTON, DC 10:00 AM - 12:00 NOON COME EARLY FOR BREAKFAST FIRST HOUR: DC'S NOTORIUS LGBT STREET GANG HAS A NEW AGENDA ? GUESTS: RONALD MOTEN INTERVENTION SPECIALIST STAR BENNETT CEO/FOUNDER "CHECK IT" SECOND HOUR: GOING DOWN MEMORY LANE DC IN THE 60s, 70s, 80s GUESTS: KENNY BROWN STEVE "FOOTS" BOLTON REV DR SANDRA BUTLER-TRUESDALE DC LEGENDARY MUSICIANS GUESTS ARE 4TH & 5TH GENERATION WASHINGTONIANS C0-HOST: ATTORNEY NKECHI TAIFA ADVOCACY DIRECTOR FOR CRIMINAL JUSTICE OPEN SOCIETY FOUNDATIONS
December 19, 2017 - FEMALES WHO HAVE MADE A DIFFERENCE IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE IN WASHINGTON, DCDecember 19, 2017 - FEMALES WHO HAVE MADE A DIFFERENCE IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE IN WASHINGTON, DCTHE GUESTS FOR CROSSROADS ON DECEMBER 19, 2017 WERE: ADRIENNE POTEAT, FORMER DEPUTY DIRECTOR, DC DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS; REV BETTY GREEN, FORMER CHAMPLAIN OF THE DC DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS AND TYRONE PARKER, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF THE ALLIANCE OF CONCERNED MEN. Mertine Moore Brown's Commentary of crossroads on 12/19/2017. FEMALES WHO HAVE MADE A DIFFERENCE IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE IN WASHINGTON, DC DECEMBER 19, 2017 GRAPEVINE At least 86 people nationwide received federal prison sentences last year for distributing drugs resulting in death or serious injury, up 16 percent from 2012, says the US Sentencing Commission. An analysis of news reports found 1,200 mentions nationally of drug-death prosecutions in 2016, three times the number in 2011. Private prison staff are disproportionately women of color and receive “poor compensation” compared to employees of incarcerated state and federal populations according to a study published this month in the International Journal of Law, Crime and Justice. There were 23 executions in 2017. Guest Adrienne Poteat – In 1975, Adrienne was the first female correctional officer at Lorton, she has helped inmates in critical situations. “If you cannot respect inmates, corrections is not for you.” There were many programs then -` culinary, basic learning, family support. Today there are no substantial programs. Rev Betty Green would meet with inmates in the Chaplain’s Office. She started as Secretary to Leonard Wiggins. Her supervisor Elwood York asked her to take position. The Champlain’s Office is Central Control; a key function in DC Jail. Religion is essential. Inmates are baptized; they love the services. Margaret Quick, Rev Betty Green, Barbara Ridley and Adrienne Poteat are perfect recipients to receive the “Harriet Tubman Freedom Award”.
December 12, 2017 - DC POLICE REVIEW BOARD DETERMINE THAT SHOOTING DEATH OF TERRENCE STERLING BY COP WAS UNJUSTIFIEDDecember 12, 2017 - DC POLICE REVIEW BOARD DETERMINE THAT SHOOTING DEATH OF TERRENCE STERLING BY COP WAS UNJUSTIFIEDThe First half of the Radio Show Today was Entitled: DC POLICE REVIEW BOARD DETERMINE THAT SHOOTING DEATH OF TERRENCE STERLING BY COP WAS UNJUSTIFIED. THE GUEST was STEVEN DOUGLAS of STEVEN DOUGLAS MINISTRIES, The 2nd Half of the Radio Show featured DR BUFORD. INTERNATIONAL DENTISTRY, DENTAL SERVICES FOR FORMERLY INCARCERATED & XMAS GIFTS FOR THEIR CHILDREN. The show was very informative as usual and gave the listeners information that sparked a conversation. Roach Brown did it again, by having such a great show.
December 5, 2017 - BLACK LAW ENFORCEMENT & CRIMINAL JUSTICE ISSUESDecember 5, 2017 - BLACK LAW ENFORCEMENT &  CRIMINAL JUSTICE ISSUESJOIN OUR LIVE RADIO BREAKFAST SHOW! BEN'S CHILI BOWL 1213 U STREET, NW WASHINGTON, DC 10:00 AM - 12:00 NOON COME EARLY FOR BREAKFAST THE HOSTS FOR THE SHOW WAS NONE OTHER THAN ROACH BROWN AND THE CO-HOST WAS NKECHI TAIFA, ADVOCACY DIRECTOR FOR CRIMINAL JUSTICE OPEN SOCIETY FOUNDATIONS FIRST HOUR: BLACK LAW ENFORCEMENT & CRIMINAL JUSTICE ISSUES SECOND HOUR: "RETURNING CITIZENS" DOCUMENTARY GUESTS: CHARLES THORNTON BOARD CHAIRMAN CORRECTIONS INFORMATION COUNCIL AL TILLMAN EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR NO OPPORTUNITY WASTED COMMENTARY BY MERTINE MOORE BROWN - ASSOCIATE PRODUCER CROSS ROADS COMMENTARY – DECEMBER 5, 2017 BLACK LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL JUSTICE ISSUES “RETURNING CITIZENS” DOCUMENTARY HOSTS: Co-Host Attorney Nkechi Taifa, Advocacy Director for Criminal Justice Open Society Foundations Roach Brown, Criminal Justice Activist GUESTS: Dwayne Crawford, National Organization of Black Law Enforcement Executives Charles Thornton, Board Chairman, Corrections Information Council (CIC) Al Tillman, Executive Director, No Opportunity Wasted GRAPEVINE Over 18 Federal halfway houses have been closed nationwide. This prevents inmates not being released 6 months early. Why is this a bipartisan issue? Make calls to Congress. In Massachusetts, 6,000 drug cases have been tainted by drug labs and must be dismissed. A former chemist was high every day she worked at the state lab. In 2014 chemists were guilty of stealing drugs from state crime labs. More than 20,000 cases had to be tossed in April. Nationally, 3 inmates have been executed this year, one half more than last year. New bill in the House of Representatives can revoke your passport based upon mere suspicion of unscrupulous activity. New York State Assemblywoman cites the racial disparities with the opioid epidemic. African Americans were prosecuted and put in jail during the drug crisis of the 90s but now that the opioid crisis is affecting Caucasians, it’s now labeled a health issue to divert these persons from prison into treatment. We need a restorative justice package for all families. There is no funding for restoration justice. Charles Thornton, through his work with Corrections Information Council (CIC) is very instrumental in highlighting issues here and across the nation. His work, shown in the documentary produced by Saffron Cassidy, “Returning Citizens”, can be ordered on ITunes, Amazon and Hulu. There is a strong group of individuals in Washington, DC who are active in this Movement. The documentary follows Roach and others as they reintegrate into society. These men and women focus on finding a solution to the problem. Returning citizens Andrea James and Glenn Martin won the prestigious, and unprecedented, international Robert Kennedy Award for their work since they’ve returned to their communities. What message are we sending? What audience is affected? We must contact policy makers. The role of the formerly incarcerated? Public Safety is huge. One person doing positive things affects the whole community. We must be careful of the message we are giving to someone coming home after serving 15, 20 years. Many guys have turned their lives around. Roach and Charles recently went to Jessup, Maryland correctional center on a prison reentry seminar, most of whom are lifers, 200-300 guys. They must think outside the box. They must create their own life. Transformation was able to happen when Lorton was here. Guys were able to take advantage of furloughs and Pell grants at Federal City College (now the University of the District of Columbia) and George Washington University. There was lots of reform then. Programs were rehabilitative. 6 Magna Cum Laude at Federal City College were inmates from Lorton. You could attend your relative’s funeral. You could go to college. Today there is trauma. The Lorton Revitalization Act closed Lorton. Programs were abolished. The school to prison pipeline is real. Pre-schoolers are being handcuffed for throwing a spit ball, pulling a girl’s pigtails…..childhood pranks. This administration has consciously taken away what was created. Previously Incarcerated Persons (PIP) must come together. There are lots of allies, special interest groups. There are over 20 million PIPS. The Department of Corrections believed in Rehabilitation (local). The BOP (Bureau of Prisons - federal) believes in punishment. People are receiving 20, 30, 40 years. Al Tillman, Executive Director, No Opportunity Wasted, helps hard to employ become employed, assist with housing and transportation. His number is 301.316.2002. He specializes in returning citizens. Returning citizens must have determination and focus. There will be lots of nos. They must be given an opportunity. You could be the next victim if you are part of the problem and not the solution. GRAPEVINE US Coast Guard operates a secret floating prison, men are shackled to the deck, floating 2 weeks to months before brought to land. Foster care youth are more likely to be chronic offenders, according to a Canadian study. Walking While Black – Jacksonville, FLorida enforcement sheriff writes hundreds of pedestrian citations yearly, $65 tickets, can damage your credit if you don’t pay, your license can get suspended. Last 5 years blacks received 55% of the tickets; are 3 times more likely as whites to receive then. Dwayne Crawford is from Atlanta. He’s glad to be at Ben’s Chili Bowl. NOBLE was founded in Washington, DC in 1976, 40 years old. They are comprised of police chiefs, sheriffs, command staff, sergeants; highest ranking Black leadership. All races and gender are included. Their purpose: fairness and equality. Equal protection under the law. Black Identity Extremists – What Blacks have been labeled who stand for justice; akin to the tactics used against the Black Panther Party. That description needs to be removed. There are 18,000+ law enforcement agencies nationwide. If you feel injustice has occurred, file a complaint. Create a paper trail. “Community is police, police are community”. This is the 40TH anniversary of the DC Human rights Act. UPCOMING EVENT Roach Brown’s play, which was written in prison, will be shown. This DVD, “HOLIDAYS…HOLLOW DAYS” is a Xmas prison play by The Inner Voices, a group started in Lorton in the 1970s. First play, poem written in solitary confinement, expanded to “XMAS IN TIME”, rewritten for National Public Television. Had national tour with Richard Pryor and received 2 standing ovations at the world-famous Apollo Theater. President Ford commuted Roach’s life sentence on Xmas Day 1975. JUSTICE ROUNDTABLE, DECEMBER 21, 2017, NOON To register, JUSTICEROUNDTABLE.ORG, Click on EVENTS Roach will showcase his comedic humor Also being shown: UNION TEMPLE BAPTIST CHURCH 1213 W Street, SE THURSDAY, DECEMBER 21, 2017, 7 – 9PM HONORING 4 WOMEN INVOLVED IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE: MARGARET QUICK, BARBARA RIDLEY, REV BETTY GREEN AND ADRIAN POTEET, who recently won a hand dance competition at WPFW annual event.
November 28, 2017 - How to Take Lemons and Make LemonadeNovember 28, 2017 - How to Take Lemons and Make LemonadeThe Radio Show Title was and the guest of the show was WILLIE JOLLEY "VOTED ONE OF TOP FIVE MOTIVATIONAL SPEAKERS WORLDWIDE" Cross Roads Commentary Mertine Moore Brown November 28, 2017 A SETBACK IS A SETUP FOR A COMEBACK Grapevine Stuffing the courts – Trump has nominated 59 judges in less than a year; largely white conservative males (code word: racist). No other President has nominated so many in so little timeframe. Female guards and prosecutors are suing inmates at Cook County jail. They say they are being subject to sexual harassment; inmates are exposing themselves or spewing lewd comments. Lawsuits are in the works. Public Defenders are fighting back against growing caseloads. They are suing states, refusing new cases, using Crowd Funding to raise money. In New Orleans, there are 60 public defenders managing 60,000 cases yearly. This impacts public defenders not being able to adequately defend others. This is a violation of their constitutional rights. The new Director of the BOP (Bureau of Prisons) is a former army general, Mark Inch. There is a photo of Mr Inch in a bullet proof vest and staff, also in bullet proof vests, going into a prison. He met with over 300 staff. What about the inmates and community groups? { Earlier this week, Attorney General Jeff Sessions announced the selection of General Mark S. Inch as the director of the Federal Bureau of Prisons (BOP). General Inch will be the first BOP Director to be selected from outside the agency – all of his predecessors have been promoted from within the organization. “As a military policeman for nearly a quarter of a century and as the head of Army Corrections for the last two years, General Inch is uniquely qualified to lead our federal prison system. My confidence that he will be a highly effective leader of the Federal Bureau of Prisons is second only to my gratitude for his willingness to continue his service to this great country in this critical role,” Sessions said. General Inch’s military education includes the Military Police Officer Basic and Advance Courses, the Command and General Staff College, the Joint and Combined Warfighting School and the Senior Service College Fellowship – Advanced Operational Arts Studies. He completed professional certification with the American Correctional Association and was the first member to earn the Certified Corrections Executive designation with Honor. General Inch most recently served as the Provost Marshal General and Commanding General of the Criminal Investigation Command and Army Corrections at Headquarters for the Department of the Army. He previously held the role of Commanding General of the Combined Joint Interagency Task Force 435 in Kabul, Afghanistan, where he was responsible for Detainee Operations and Rule of Law Development within the Army’s Security Sector. His experience in these posts will not only have an immediate effect on BOP, but correctional leaders in state and county facilities will have an excellent role model at the top. According to a report in the Washington Examiner, the Federal Bureau of Prisons had a population of approximately 190,000 inmates across 122 facilities as of 2016, and that according to federal data, 46 percent of the inmates are incarcerated for drug crimes. With Sessions’ stated desire to aggressively go after drug- and gang-related criminals, that population is likely to increase. General Inch will not shrink from the challenges he will face when it does. Another perspective on this is the Trump administration’s goal to expand the use of private prison beds, reversing the Obama administration's doctrine of reducing private prisons' associations with the BOP. Since private corrections have been criticized for poor operations, profit motive, etc., I am betting that AG Sessions wants a strong man at the helm. Correctional facilities run better with strong administrators.” – Gary Cornelius, CorrectionsOne Contributor The use of private prisons will be high on their list because the Trump administration reversed the Obama position to discontinue private prisons. General Inch will be tested. It will be interesting to see how the BOP deals with their change in leadership. This is new for the agency, but overall should bring positive results. General Inch will bring order and direction to the BOP.” – Bob Hood, CorrectionsOne Contributor } The above mandate follows what 45 said when he was running, “Law and order”. People, what do you think he meant? The above is a side bar you need to know. Back to Willie Jolley and Roach Brown. That is why they do what they do and why we must continue to do what we do. You may have my body, but you don’t have my mind. Willie committed to raise money for the JROTC program at Theodore Roosevelt High School Alumni Association. I am an alumnus. Roach would not accept a life sentence. He did not realize he was practicing motivation and developing a mindset of determination. Dr Willie Jolley has committed to share his knowledge in the prisons and the schools; that’s where our great minds are laying dormant. Visit Dr Willie Jolley, glean from his wisdom, smile and know that you too can be and have whatever you want. Jolleygoodnews.org - Books Beyond Bars - youth videos in schools. jolleyrichspeaking.com Youcanspeaknow.com Jolleymarriage.com Dr Willie Jolley’s office - 202.723.8863 Dr Jolley is hosting a Speaking Business Seminar on December 9, call his office on 202.723.8883. Know your purpose – focus – don’t quit! Says Dr Willie, “Service is the new definition of greatness – one of service. Heart of love, soul generated by grace. “But for the grace of God”. Jesus said visit those in prison, feed the hungry, the greatest among us is the greatest servant.” Every Prison Library should have every book and video of Dr Willie Jolley. Roach spoke at Jessup, Maryland prison – brothers been in 30, 35, 40 years. Roach cried. Everyone has an inner voice – set a vision – without a vision the people will perish - a clear vision will grow. You got your mind – motivational speaking is part of reentry. A big shot is a little shot who kept shooting. Dr Willie Jolley has been Inducted into the Speaking Hall of Fame, along with the greatest, Les Brown, Zig Ziglar, Colin Powell….. Habits – develop excellent habits “Think and Grow Rich” by Napoleon Hill – go to williejolley.com/gift to download your copy of the book. Laughter is the best medicine. 1976 was an amazing year for Jolley – from triumph to tragedy – his live band was replaced with a karaoke machine. Jolley spoke in Portland, Oregon at the Lions Club - blindness prevention organization - Helen Keller changed the organization, she was born blind and deaf, Helen overcame and became the greatest communicator. She said what’s worse that being blind and deaf is “having sight and no vision”. Baltimore City court rooms, prisons, schools – School to Prison Pipeline – Jolley’s books need to be everywhere. Dr Willie Jolley is inspired by his own brother, Noble, who has passed away, but left a grand legacy through his children – one son is the first jazz graduate from Howard University; Rashida, his daughter, who has changed her stage name to Tulani, has toured worldwide with Lady Gaga; another daughter Vivian is a cancer surgeon, another a gemologist and a family full of world class musicians.
November 21, 2017 - DC CORRECTIONS/US PAROLE COMMISSION ISSUES DC PAROLE BOARD NEEDS TO BE REACTIVATEDNovember 21, 2017 - DC CORRECTIONS/US PAROLE COMMISSION ISSUES  DC PAROLE BOARD NEEDS TO BE REACTIVATEDThe guests for the show were Jamie Argento Rodriguez, Chief, Community Defender Division of the The Public Defender Service for the District of Columbia and Michelle Bonner, Executive Director; DC Corrections Information Council (CIC). The first segment of the show was " How are DC Code Prisoners being Treated in the Bureau of Prisons" (BOP) and the Second part of the show spoke to the issue of "Are Correct DC Parole Guidelines being Applied to DC Prisoners Confined in the Bureau of Prisons"? (BOP) Cross Roads Commentary by Mertine Moore Brown, Associate Producer November 21, 2017 DC Corrections/US Parole Commission Issues Grapevine A Federal Judge has ordered that inmates confined in the Florida Dept. of Corrections who are infected with Hepatitis C must be treated. DC Councilmember Robert White secures $1.5m to support entrepreneurship for DC’s Previously Incarcerated Persons (PIPS). Trump votes to cut poor people off cell phone service. Federal Communications Commission endorses this cruel act. Restorative Justice for Shoplifting – When a shoplifter is taken to Walmart’s back room, they are shown a video on how to avoid a criminal record, they must confess, pay a $50 fee to participate with a privately-run company, Corrective Education Company, which orders you to pay $400. If you don’t have the money, you go to jail. This is textbook extortion. This practice is in 2,000 Walmart stores across the country. This offender funded program was started in 2011. Guests Jamie Rodriguez, Chief, Public Defender Service (PDS) Michelle Bonner, Esq., Executive Director, DC Corrections Information Council (CIC), an independent small government agency mandated to inspect DC jails, prisons and halfway houses where DC prisoners are confined. DC prisoners are housed around the country. Parole and prison have been turned over to the federal government. When the Hearing Examiner recommends parole, the Parole Commission may issue 5 - 10-year hit (additional time). This is an ongoing issue that requires legal assistance. What can families expect from CIC? Call them on 202.478.9211 if a loved one is sick, ill or being hurt. The federal government abolished the DC Board of Parole. In the 1970s, DC prisoners were going to college, furloughs were available. There are 4,700 DC prisoners, 73% are within 500 miles and many do not support a public bus system or Amtrak. District representatives are trying to bring prisoners closer to town, so service providers can work with them before they return home. DC prisoners receive longer time, exorbitant sentences. Public Defender Service represent individual cases. They have a dozen or so lawyers. The focus is on currently incarcerated, they hold proceedings at DC jail. Write the PDS to network with nearby attorneys. PDS – 202.628.1200 or 202.824.2801, 1442 Pennsylvania Avenue, SE Washington, DC. DC leaders are paying attention. The Deputy Mayor has met with Congresswoman Norton and with the Bureau of Prisons (BOP). This prison system violates civil and human rights. Call the ACLU (American Civil Liberties Union) for help. 16, 17 halfway houses are being closed. BOP has contract with halfway houses; Hope Village for Men, Fairview for women. DC code is not affecting DC offenses. BOP has dress code that punishes and costs family members. Parole hearing is the same as a resentencing hearing. Now there are teleconference hearings. What is your release plan? What trainings, jobs, support? You must admit guilt at hearings. If a parent or child died, in previous years you would be allowed to go to the funeral. A caller suggested the use of St Elizabeth’s land, which formally housed the mentally ill. Another caller’s son is doing 20 years, he was at Red Onion, one of the most notorious in the country, located in Virginia. Event MOVING TOWARD LOCAL CONTROL OF DC’S CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM Thursday, November 30, 2017 – 7:00pm UDC David A Clarke School of Law Moot Court Room (518) 4340 Connecticut Avenue, NW Register at: http://www.law.udc.edu/event/LocalControl
MOVING TOWARD LOCAL CONTROL OF DC'S CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEMFree, but please register here: http://www.law.udc.edu/event/LocalControl DC STATEHOOD COALITION and The UDC David A. Clarke School of Law present a Forum on MOVING TOWARD LOCAL CONTROL OF DC'S CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM Thursday, November 30, 7:00 pm UDC David A. Clarke School of Law Moot Court Room (518) 4340 Connecticut Avenue, NW Welcome by UDC Law Dean Shelley Broderick Moderator, Tammy Seltzer, Director, University Legal Services' Jail and Prison Advocacy Project Speakers Johnny Barnes, Former Executive Director of the ACLU of the Nation's Capital, www.livinqwiththelaw.com Avis Buchanan, Director, Public Defender Service for the District of Columbia, www.Qdsdc.org Eleanor Holmes Norton, DC Delegate to the House of Representatives, https://norton.house.aov Louis Sawyer, Jr., Chair, DC Reentry Task Force Co-Sponsors: Council for Court Excellence DC Democratic State Committee DC Federation of Democratic Women DC for Democracy DC Latino Leadership Council DC Statehood Green Party League of Women Voters of DC Stand Up for Democracy in DC (Free DC) Ward Three Democrats Washington Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights and Urban Affairs Woman's National Democratic Club
November 13, 2017 - Pre-emptionNovember 13, 2017 -  Pre-emptionThe Pacifica Radio Archives will be hosting fundraising across the network from 9am-midnight EST this Tuesday, November 14.
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Washington Post Article:  Dr. Frances Cress Welsing

Washington Post Article: Dr. Frances Cress Welsing

The Washington Post

March 18, 2016

Memorial service to be held for celebrated, controversial Frances Cress Welsing.
Psychiatrist and author Frances Cress Welsing was known for her controversial views on race. (Elvert Barnes/elvertbarnes.com)
By Hamil R. Harris March 17 at 10:32 PM  
When family members, friends, and colleagues of Frances Cress Welsing began planning a memorial service for the psychiatrist and author who devoted her life to studying racism and its root causes, they knew they would have a tall order trying to capture her impact.

She was both celebrated and controversial, but never wavering in her belief that the persistent struggles of people of color were the results of the racism they had endured. Welsing died Jan. 2, a few hours after suffering a stroke. She was 80.
Welsing provided psychiatric services to D.C. government agencies and institutions for 27 years. She also maintained a private practice in the District beginning in 1967, counseling patients until days before her death.
Several of those she helped, such as motivational speaker and radio host Roach Brown, say they owe her their lives.
In 1965, Brown was a 21-year-old inmate at the D.C. Department of Correction’s prison in Lorton, Va. A year earlier, he and two other men had been charged with first-degree murder in the shooting death of a “local fence in a dispute over the price of hot jewelry,” Brown said.

[The price of redemption]

No weapon was ever recovered, and Brown, now 72, has always maintained that he was not the triggerman.
Welsing testified during his trial that his actions were consistent with someone whose environment had led to mental-health problems.
“They ended up giving me life in prison because Dr. Welsing spoke up on my behalf,” said Brown, who went on to start the prison theatrical group Inner Voices. “She saw something in me that I didn’t see in myself.”
Brown, who had his sentenced commuted in 1975, will be among those in attendance at the memorial service for Welsing on Saturday from 1 to 4 p.m. at Metropolitan AME Church in the District. “Dr. Welsing turned me and other guys around,” Brown said. “She was our Harriet Tubman to get out of mental slavery.”

Welsing first gained notoriety in 1969 after she wrote an essay, “The Cress Theory of Color Confrontation and Racism (White Supremacy).” In it she theorized that racism was rooted in the varying degrees of melanin and the “color inferiority” of white people. She argued that the lack of melanin led white people to develop “hostility and aggression” toward people darker than themselves.
 “She had a theory about race and why white people do what they do and I dealt with the what,” said Neely Fuller, author of “The United Independent Compensatory Code System Concept: a textbook/workbook for thought speech and/or action for victims of racism (white supremacy).”

In her 1991 book, “The Isis Papers: The Keys to the Colors,” Welsing again looked at the origins of white supremacy and its impact. She wrote that “black males must help one another to understand that they are being led by the dynamic of white supremacy to inflict extreme damage upon themselves and each other.”

[Welsing’s work provokes different reactions]

“Dr. Welsing’s major contribution as it relates to black mental health was that she had the capacity to challenge the dominant prevailing thought of our society and she gave it the name global white supremacy,” said Kevin Washington, president of the Association of Black Psychologists.

Ray Winbush, director of the Institute for Urban Research at Morgan State University and former director of the Race Relations Institute at Fisk University, said Welsing drew heavy criticism for her views, which she expected. She frequently engaged her detractors.

In 1974, she and Stanford University physicist William Shockley, who had argued that blacks were genetically inferior to whites, engaged in debate on the syndicated television show “Tony Brown’s Journal.”
Welsing was born in Chicago in 1935.Her father, Henry N. Cress was a physician, and her mother, Ida Mae Griffen, was a school teacher, and there were high expectations.
“We were taught that we were special,” said Welsing’s older sister, Lorne Cress-Love. “We were encouraged to read and discuss all types of issues.”

Cress-Love said their father and their grandfather, who also was a physician, were passionate about fighting for equality. “My father told us that our grandfather spent more time fighting for the race than practicing medicine.”
In 1957, Welsing earned a bachelor’s degree from Antioch College and in 1962 she earned a medical degree from the Howard University College of Medicine. After graduation, Welsing completed a residency at St. Elizabeths Hospital in Washington. From 1968 to 1975, she taught in the pediatric department of Howard University’s Medical School.
 
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