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Crossroads Radio Show Annual Calendar

Crossroads Radio Show Annual Calendar

March 13, 2018 - MASS INCARCERATION OF THE MENTALLY ILLMarch 13, 2018 - MASS INCARCERATION OF THE MENTALLY ILLTHE TOPIC FOR THIS SHOW WAS MASS INCARCERATION OF THE MENTALLY ILL AND THE GUEST WAS SHARON VOLLIN, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF MAMIMI (MOVEMENT AGAINST MASS INCARCERATION OF THE MENTALLY ILL) MS. VOLLIN HAS A PROGRAM THAT PROMOTES HEALTH FOR THE MENTALLY AFFECTED PERSONS OF THE WORLD. HER WEBSITE IS WWW.BLUELOTUSILLUMINATION.COM . HER INSTAGRAM IS BLUELOTUSILLUMINATION....TWITTER IS @BLUE LOTUS ILLUMINATION AND HER FACEBOOK PAGE IS SHARON VOLLIN. GO TO THESE SITES TO CHECK OUT HER BOOK, SOME POETRY AND ART.
March 8, 2018 - The Juvenile Justice System live from the Youth Development CenterMarch 8, 2018 - The Juvenile Justice System live from the Youth Development CenterThis radio show was a call to action regarding the youth. Roach Brown went out to New Beginnings and had a wonderful radio show about helping the youth through the media, plays, functions, and education. There are females in a troupe that dances regularly and the moves come from the pain that they experienced in their lives and the creativity and research of the director. They spoke about dance being therapeutic. They had some of the youth on the air talking about how they have changed since being in the program. Ms. Raquita (youth) spoke about her commitment, she's the President of Youth Council that is female dominated. She stated that DYRS never gave up on her. She experienced new things with DYRS (New York City, the Jay-Z Concert, etc.) She spoke about needing support and love and she received it at DYRS. This was a great radio show and spoke to how the youth have come together through challenges and program. Progam manager Ms. Assanti was also on the air. She provides programs in many different aspects to ensure that the youth learn self respect, moral, etc.
March 6, 2018 - JUVENILE JUSTICE AND THE COMMUNITY and RETURNING CITIZENS TRAUMA RESPONSE TEAM March 6, 2018 - JUVENILE JUSTICE AND THE COMMUNITY and RETURNING CITIZENS TRAUMA RESPONSE TEAM                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                       Today's Radio Show was at Ben's Chili Bowl and the topic of the first hour was JUVENILE JUSTICE AND THE COMMUNITY and the guest were CLINTON LACEY, DIRECTOR OF DYRS and LINDA HARLLEE HARPER, DEPUTY DIRECTOR OF THE DEPARTMENT OF YOUTH REHABILITATION SERVICES. AND THE SECOND HALF OF THE RADIO SHOWS TOPIC WAS RETURNING CITIZENS TRAUMA RESPONSE TEAM AND THE GUESTS FOR THIS PORTION OF THE SHOW WERE TYRONE PARKER, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF THE ALLIANCE OF CONCERNED MEN AND RON HAMPTON, DIRECTOR OF BLACKS IN LAW ENFORCEMENT. THE SHOW WAS VERY INFORMATIVE AND THE GUESTS SPOKE FROM THEIR HEARTS ABOUT THE IMPACT OF INCARCERATION ON YOUTH AND ADULTS. Commentary by Mertine Moore Brown on 3/6/2018 - Cross Roads Commentary March 6, 2018 JUVENILE JUSTICE AND THE COMMUNITY Guests: Clinton Lacey, Director and Linda Harllee Harper, Deputy Director, Dept of Youth Rehabilitation Services’ (DYRS) New objective - working not just with juvenile but including the family. Credible Messenger program – full time employees, formerly incarcerated serving as mentors and coaches. DYRS’ greatest asset is partnering with community organizations. Keeping young people home, in the community versus sending them to facilities out of the area, which was practice for years. New Beginnings is the name of the juvenile facility. Journey Beyond program, initiated by Linda Harper, is designed around the needs of young women and girls. There are limited resources in terms of residential care in DC. Journey Beyond is a Saturday morning program that engages young people with community services. Some young folks do need to go away to get stabilized. Current offerings include automotive and lawn care training. Youth receive certification. Mr Matthews, the Maintenance Supervisor, has been a role model. The program is his namesake because of his dedication and commitment to the youth. ¼ of juveniles are held for non- criminal infractions (status offenders); truancy, running away…..DC has outlawed status offenders from detention centers – youth now live in homes and are provided housing. Ankle bracelet is better use vs incarceration, still being on parole/probation. So important to partner with the village. DYRS has 60 credible messengers, male and female, wrapping around our young people 24/7. 18 year olds currently in jail will be sent to DYRS upon turning age 21 versus being sent to the big house. Restorative justice – the “L” word – love – True justice is an act of love, says Martin Luther King. One Restorative approach is with Georgetown ASK program. Students pick youth up and expose them to college life. It should expand to include other universities and colleges. 95% of incarcerated youth are black and brown. DYRS is here to work with you, not to you or for you. 2nd segment – Returning Citizens Trauma Response Team Tyrone Parker – Alliance of Concerned Men Ron Hampton – Blacks in Law Enforcement Grapevine – News You Can Use Its hard for inmates to sue the prison system. We must stop sending children to prison. It is unconstitutional to send juveniles to prison for 50 or more years. The Justice Dept is seeking more funding; Atty General Sessions has pushed more prosecutorial practices. He is squeezing the resources of its Civil Rights Division, which works to protect Americans from discrimination. IBW, Institute of Black World, Dr Ron Daniels, from a public safety perspective, how to circumvent retaliation with youth, street intervention – getting to the hospital, build relationship with youth and family members, go back to where the incident occurred, what other natural resources are available? Going into the community can be a dangerous job. You must bring the community in the loop, focus on returnees, wrap around services, manage mental health issues, participate in town hall meetings, utilize folks who live in the community. Most law enforcement does not live in the community. There must be a wholistic approach. Love is the one single component. Formerly incarcerated are the best mentors. A Washington Post article says this program is giving money to returnees to prevent crime. How about money to navigate and live on after being jailed 10, 20, 30 years without adequate support once they return home? Thursday through Sunday, 10am – 7pm – Statistics say that’s the most violent time in communities. We need collaborative support of programs that can be expanded nationally. How do we connect with larger organizations to make the impact that needs to be done? DC has been ahead of the curve. DC is a model that should be looked at now. SUPPORT: DC JUSTICE COLLABORATIVE MEETING – WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7, 2018 – 6pm - 508 Kennedy Street, NW, 3rd floor, Washington, DC CONGRATULATIONS: Rev Willie Wilson – inducted into Museum of Slavery and Civil Rights, Selma, Alabama
February 27, 2018 - There are two Topic for today's showFebruary 27, 2018 - There are two Topic for today's showTHE RADIO SHOW FOR THE DAY WAS DIVIDED INTO TWO SEGMENTS: TOPIC ONE: EXCESSIVE WATER RATES IMPOSED ON BLACK CHURCHES IN WASHINGTON, DC. TOPIC 2: UNVEILING OF LATE MAYOR MARION BARRY'S STATUE (MAYOR FOR LIFE) THE GUEST FOR TOPIC ONE WAS PASTOR WILLIE WILSON OF UNION TEMPLE BAPTIST CHURCH, 1225 W STREET, SE, WASHINGTON, DC. REVEREND WILLIE SPOKE ABOUT THE SECOND TOPIC OF THE SHOW AS WELL. HE SPOKE ABOUT THE EXCESSIVE WATER RATES IN THE AFRICAN AMERICAN COMMUNITY AND HOW HE WOULD BE TEACHING OUR PEOPLE HOW TO GET AWAY FROM ALL OF THE EXCESSIVE RATES THAT MAKES THE BILLS OUTRAGEOUS. HE ALSO SPOKE ABOUT HIS FRIEND AND PARISHIONER, MARION BARRY AND THE UNVEILING OF THE STATUTE. Cross Roads Commentary February 27, 2018 EXCESSIVE WATER RATES IMPOSED ON BLACK CHURCHES IN WASHINGTON DC $38M per day to jail folks nationwide; $14B annually. More expensive to jail elderly, sickly and mentally ill. City of Brotherly Love: Closed 23 schools but build $400M prison. Thursday night rally @ Union Temple, 7pm – Plan of Action 38 schools closed in DC; upgraded for incoming demographics We have been political whores; become prostitutes
February 20, 2018 - S MARYLAND PAROLE COMMISSION FOLLOWING THE LAW FOR JUVENILES SERVING LIFE ?February 20, 2018 - S MARYLAND PAROLE COMMISSION FOLLOWING THE LAW FOR  JUVENILES SERVING LIFE ?The topic for the radio show today is: IS MARYLAND PAROLE COMMISSION FOLLOWING THE LAW FOR JUVENILES SERVING LIFE ? The guests for the show were: Brian Saccenti, Chief Attorney at the Maryland Office's Public Defender Appellate Division; Eddie Conway who served 44 years in prison, is a former Black Panther and writes for the Real News and Stanley Mitchell who served 38 years for a crime that he was not guilty of. Stanley is also a Credible Messenger. These three (3) gentlemen spoke intelligently and vehemently about the prison system and the sentence of life verses death. The question on the table was, "What does a life sentence mean"? Does it imply that a person is facing execution or does it mean that they will be in the system until they die? What is the difference? COMMENTARY BY MERTINE MOORE BROWN Cross Roads Tuesday, February 20, 2018 Is Maryland Commission Following the Law for Juveniles Serving Life ? Grapevine Canada prohibits solitary confinement. Many states are joining in this worldwide movement to address this cruel practice. Raising minimum wage reduces recidivism – how bright to realize that! ¼ juveniles are held nationwide for non-criminal infractions – truancy, run away, underage drinking. West Virginia leads the nation. Cynthia Powell, a mother and grandmother, got 25 years for selling 35 pills, It was a setup; an undercover agent kept contacting her until she relented because she needed $300 to supplement her rent. Guests Brian Saccenti – Chief Attorney – Maryland Office, Public Defender, Appellate Division Eddie Conway – served 44 years – former Black Panther, Editor, TheRealNews.com Stanley Mitchell – served 38 years, Credible Messenger Maryland’s state parole system has not released in over 20 years anyone serving a life sentence. No such thing as parole for a lifer. Since the 1990s, no juvenile lifer has been paroled in Maryland. Juveniles are capable of change, personalities are not set. Governor signs off parole – can override parole board. Unger Decision – almost 300 men and 1 woman were released because the state of Maryland had faulty trials in the majority of cases. -2- Maryland is holding people who are legally eligible for parole. Expect ruling by end of August – life sentences do not give people the opportunity to obtain release and have a second chance. Court should vacate sentences, people are recommended for parole and still do 20 more years. Juveniles are housed with adults. Prison dehumanizes people, caged and treated like an animal. Juveniles must see movement on the back end – folks going to school, learning a trade. All juveniles sentenced to life, according to the Supreme Court, are denied parole based on the nature of the offense. A lot of folks in prison are innocent. Just passed, a bill will give $50,000 per year to those wrongfully convicted. Its called a Certificate of Actual Innocence - from State’s Attorney or Judge rule. $300,000 is the cap. Money doesn’t compensate for the pain and misery - parents die while you’re inside, hard to maintain a relationship with your children, waste of a great mind. 70% of Black men in America have a criminal record. www.TheRealNews.com will critique Black Panther movie. Eddie Conway does a story on the impact of prison, prisoners & families. Private prisons donate to governors and politicians. A Bill is pending to take the governor out of the process. The solution to the problem of crime in the streets is locked up in the prisons.
February 13, 2018 - WOMEN FACING REENTRY CHALLENGES ARE REENTRY CHALLENGES DIFFERENT FOR WOMEN THAN MEN ?February 13, 2018 - WOMEN FACING REENTRY CHALLENGES  ARE REENTRY CHALLENGES DIFFERENT FOR WOMEN THAN MEN ?The show was hosted by Attorney Nkechi Taifa, ADVOCACY DIRECTOR FOR CRIMINAL JUSTICE OPEN SOCIETY FOUNDATIONS who stood in for Roach and Mertine Moore Brown. The guest for the show was laShonia Thompson-El, founder of THE W.I.R.E. (WOMEN INVOLVED IN REENTRY EFFORTS)who spoke about her life story and her road to redemption.
February 6, 2018 - FIRST HOUR: CRIMINAL JUSTICE REFORMFebruary 6, 2018 - FIRST HOUR:  CRIMINAL JUSTICE REFORMThe first hour of today's radio program was entitled CRIMINAL JUSTICE REFORM and the guest was none other than the Honorable CONGRESSWOMAN ELEANOR HOLMES NORTON, WHO SPOKE ABOUT THE BUREAU OF PRISON (BOP) AND THE ISSUES AFFECTING DC PRISONERS. The second hour's title was CRIMINAL JUSTICE REFORM PART II and the guests were: SAKIRA COOK, ESQ, THE LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE ON CIVIL RIGHTS and KARA GOTSCH, DIRECTOR OF STRATEGIC INITIATIVES at THE SENTENCING PROJECT.
January 30, 2018 - WHY ARE PRISONS BECOMING MORE LIKE NURSING HOMESJanuary 30, 2018 - WHY ARE PRISONS BECOMING MORE LIKE NURSING HOMESTHE GUESTS FOR THIS SHOW WERE RABIAH BURKS, DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS OF F.A.M.M. AND STANLEY MITCHELL WHO SERVED 38 YEARS IN PRISON. THE SHOW WAS VERY INTERESTING AND BOTH GUESTS GAVE THEIR VIEWS REGARDING THE SENIORS IN PRISON.
January 23, 2018 - OFFENDER ANONYMOUS (OA) AFTER PRISON, RETURNING CITIZENS FACE ANOTHER KIND OF HELLJanuary 23, 2018 - OFFENDER ANONYMOUS (OA)  AFTER PRISON, RETURNING CITIZENS FACE ANOTHER KIND OF HELLTODAY'S RADIO SHOW WAS TITLED: OFFENDER ANONYMOUS (OA) - AFTER PRISON, RETURNING CITIZENS FACE ANOTHER KIND OF HELL. THE GUESTS FOR THE SHOW WERE: JEREMY KITTREDGE, RESEARCH ASSOCIATE FROM THE JUSTICE POLICY INSTITUTE; BEATRICE CODIANNI, MANAGING EDITOR AT REENTRY CENTRAL AND STANLEY MITCHELL WHO SERVED 38 YEARS IN PRISON. THIS SHOW WAS VERY CLOSE TO HOST ROACH BROWN'S HEART AND THE GUESTS WERE VERY KNOWLEDGEABLE. EACH ORATION WAS VERY HEARTFELT AND GAVE THE LISTENING AUDIENCE AN IDEA OF WHAT RETURNING CITIZENS FACE UPON THEIR RETURN TO THE COMMUNITY.
JANUARY 16, 2018 - BROKEN TRAIL OF DREAMS DACA (DEFERRED ACTION FOR CHILDHOOD ARRIVALS) IMMIGRANT CHILDREN'S DREAMS ARE IN LIMBOJANUARY 16, 2018 - BROKEN TRAIL OF DREAMS  DACA (DEFERRED ACTION FOR CHILDHOOD ARRIVALS)  IMMIGRANT CHILDREN'S DREAMS ARE IN LIMBOTHE RADIO SHOW FOR TODAY WAS ENTITLED: BROKEN TRAIL OF DREAMS - DACA - (DEFERRED ACTION FOR CHILDHOOD ARRIVALS) IMMIGRANT CHILDREN'S DREAMS ARE IN LIMBO. THE GUESTS FOR TODAY'S SHOW WERE: TED LOZA, COMMUNITY ACTIVIST, POLITICAL & PUBLIC RELATIONS CONSULTANT AND ILSY MARILYN, DACA ADVOCATE. COMMENTARY BY MERTINE MOORE BROWN: Blind Stan offers this unique piece of advice: Education, entertainment and therapy are all together. Ted Loza adds that this all evolves into one word: Family. Undocumented immigrants have contributed $11b to the economy. Most are law abiding citizens and pay taxes. We need to be careful how we spend our money. There is power in numbers. Families are being torn apart from these deportations. The African American community has already been affected. With men out of the community, boys don't know they are boys and girls don't know how to be girls.
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Washington Post Article:  Dr. Frances Cress Welsing

Washington Post Article: Dr. Frances Cress Welsing

The Washington Post

March 18, 2016

Memorial service to be held for celebrated, controversial Frances Cress Welsing.
Psychiatrist and author Frances Cress Welsing was known for her controversial views on race. (Elvert Barnes/elvertbarnes.com)
By Hamil R. Harris March 17 at 10:32 PM  
When family members, friends, and colleagues of Frances Cress Welsing began planning a memorial service for the psychiatrist and author who devoted her life to studying racism and its root causes, they knew they would have a tall order trying to capture her impact.

She was both celebrated and controversial, but never wavering in her belief that the persistent struggles of people of color were the results of the racism they had endured. Welsing died Jan. 2, a few hours after suffering a stroke. She was 80.
Welsing provided psychiatric services to D.C. government agencies and institutions for 27 years. She also maintained a private practice in the District beginning in 1967, counseling patients until days before her death.
Several of those she helped, such as motivational speaker and radio host Roach Brown, say they owe her their lives.
In 1965, Brown was a 21-year-old inmate at the D.C. Department of Correction’s prison in Lorton, Va. A year earlier, he and two other men had been charged with first-degree murder in the shooting death of a “local fence in a dispute over the price of hot jewelry,” Brown said.

[The price of redemption]

No weapon was ever recovered, and Brown, now 72, has always maintained that he was not the triggerman.
Welsing testified during his trial that his actions were consistent with someone whose environment had led to mental-health problems.
“They ended up giving me life in prison because Dr. Welsing spoke up on my behalf,” said Brown, who went on to start the prison theatrical group Inner Voices. “She saw something in me that I didn’t see in myself.”
Brown, who had his sentenced commuted in 1975, will be among those in attendance at the memorial service for Welsing on Saturday from 1 to 4 p.m. at Metropolitan AME Church in the District. “Dr. Welsing turned me and other guys around,” Brown said. “She was our Harriet Tubman to get out of mental slavery.”

Welsing first gained notoriety in 1969 after she wrote an essay, “The Cress Theory of Color Confrontation and Racism (White Supremacy).” In it she theorized that racism was rooted in the varying degrees of melanin and the “color inferiority” of white people. She argued that the lack of melanin led white people to develop “hostility and aggression” toward people darker than themselves.
 “She had a theory about race and why white people do what they do and I dealt with the what,” said Neely Fuller, author of “The United Independent Compensatory Code System Concept: a textbook/workbook for thought speech and/or action for victims of racism (white supremacy).”

In her 1991 book, “The Isis Papers: The Keys to the Colors,” Welsing again looked at the origins of white supremacy and its impact. She wrote that “black males must help one another to understand that they are being led by the dynamic of white supremacy to inflict extreme damage upon themselves and each other.”

[Welsing’s work provokes different reactions]

“Dr. Welsing’s major contribution as it relates to black mental health was that she had the capacity to challenge the dominant prevailing thought of our society and she gave it the name global white supremacy,” said Kevin Washington, president of the Association of Black Psychologists.

Ray Winbush, director of the Institute for Urban Research at Morgan State University and former director of the Race Relations Institute at Fisk University, said Welsing drew heavy criticism for her views, which she expected. She frequently engaged her detractors.

In 1974, she and Stanford University physicist William Shockley, who had argued that blacks were genetically inferior to whites, engaged in debate on the syndicated television show “Tony Brown’s Journal.”
Welsing was born in Chicago in 1935.Her father, Henry N. Cress was a physician, and her mother, Ida Mae Griffen, was a school teacher, and there were high expectations.
“We were taught that we were special,” said Welsing’s older sister, Lorne Cress-Love. “We were encouraged to read and discuss all types of issues.”

Cress-Love said their father and their grandfather, who also was a physician, were passionate about fighting for equality. “My father told us that our grandfather spent more time fighting for the race than practicing medicine.”
In 1957, Welsing earned a bachelor’s degree from Antioch College and in 1962 she earned a medical degree from the Howard University College of Medicine. After graduation, Welsing completed a residency at St. Elizabeths Hospital in Washington. From 1968 to 1975, she taught in the pediatric department of Howard University’s Medical School.
 
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