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Crossroads Radio Show Annual Calendar

Crossroads Radio Show Annual Calendar

February 6, 2018 - FIRST HOUR: CRIMINAL JUSTICE REFORMFebruary 6, 2018 - FIRST HOUR:  CRIMINAL JUSTICE REFORMThe first hour of today's radio program was entitled CRIMINAL JUSTICE REFORM and the guest was none other than the Honorable CONGRESSWOMAN ELEANOR HOLMES NORTON, WHO SPOKE ABOUT THE BUREAU OF PRISON (BOP) AND THE ISSUES AFFECTING DC PRISONERS. The second hour's title was CRIMINAL JUSTICE REFORM PART II and the guests were: SAKIRA COOK, ESQ, THE LEADERSHIP CONFERENCE ON CIVIL RIGHTS and KARA GOTSCH, DIRECTOR OF STRATEGIC INITIATIVES at THE SENTENCING PROJECT.
January 30, 2018 - WHY ARE PRISONS BECOMING MORE LIKE NURSING HOMESJanuary 30, 2018 - WHY ARE PRISONS BECOMING MORE LIKE NURSING HOMESTHE GUESTS FOR THIS SHOW WERE RABIAH BURKS, DIRECTOR OF COMMUNICATIONS OF F.A.M.M. AND STANLEY MITCHELL WHO SERVED 38 YEARS IN PRISON. THE SHOW WAS VERY INTERESTING AND BOTH GUESTS GAVE THEIR VIEWS REGARDING THE SENIORS IN PRISON.
April 30, 2019 -
January 23, 2018 - OFFENDER ANONYMOUS (OA) AFTER PRISON, RETURNING CITIZENS FACE ANOTHER KIND OF HELLJanuary 23, 2018 - OFFENDER ANONYMOUS (OA)  AFTER PRISON, RETURNING CITIZENS FACE ANOTHER KIND OF HELLTODAY'S RADIO SHOW WAS TITLED: OFFENDER ANONYMOUS (OA) - AFTER PRISON, RETURNING CITIZENS FACE ANOTHER KIND OF HELL. THE GUESTS FOR THE SHOW WERE: JEREMY KITTREDGE, RESEARCH ASSOCIATE FROM THE JUSTICE POLICY INSTITUTE; BEATRICE CODIANNI, MANAGING EDITOR AT REENTRY CENTRAL AND STANLEY MITCHELL WHO SERVED 38 YEARS IN PRISON. THIS SHOW WAS VERY CLOSE TO HOST ROACH BROWN'S HEART AND THE GUESTS WERE VERY KNOWLEDGEABLE. EACH ORATION WAS VERY HEARTFELT AND GAVE THE LISTENING AUDIENCE AN IDEA OF WHAT RETURNING CITIZENS FACE UPON THEIR RETURN TO THE COMMUNITY.
JANUARY 16, 2018 - BROKEN TRAIL OF DREAMS DACA (DEFERRED ACTION FOR CHILDHOOD ARRIVALS) IMMIGRANT CHILDREN'S DREAMS ARE IN LIMBOJANUARY 16, 2018 - BROKEN TRAIL OF DREAMS  DACA (DEFERRED ACTION FOR CHILDHOOD ARRIVALS)  IMMIGRANT CHILDREN'S DREAMS ARE IN LIMBOTHE RADIO SHOW FOR TODAY WAS ENTITLED: BROKEN TRAIL OF DREAMS - DACA - (DEFERRED ACTION FOR CHILDHOOD ARRIVALS) IMMIGRANT CHILDREN'S DREAMS ARE IN LIMBO. THE GUESTS FOR TODAY'S SHOW WERE: TED LOZA, COMMUNITY ACTIVIST, POLITICAL & PUBLIC RELATIONS CONSULTANT AND ILSY MARILYN, DACA ADVOCATE. COMMENTARY BY MERTINE MOORE BROWN: Blind Stan offers this unique piece of advice: Education, entertainment and therapy are all together. Ted Loza adds that this all evolves into one word: Family. Undocumented immigrants have contributed $11b to the economy. Most are law abiding citizens and pay taxes. We need to be careful how we spend our money. There is power in numbers. Families are being torn apart from these deportations. The African American community has already been affected. With men out of the community, boys don't know they are boys and girls don't know how to be girls.
January 9, 2018 - CAN EXPANDING "SAFE STREETS" HALT BALTIMORE'S VIOLENCE ?January 9, 2018 - CAN EXPANDING "SAFE STREETS" HALT BALTIMORE'S VIOLENCE ?The radio show for this day was entitled: CAN EXPANDING "SAFE STREETS" HALT BALTIMORE'S VIOLENCE ? THE GUEST WAS EDDIE CONWAY, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF THE REAL NEWS.COM AND FORMER BLACK PANTHER POLITICAL PRISONER SERVED 43 YEARS MARYLAND PRISON SYSTEM BALTIMORE NATIVE.
January 2, 2018 - FIRST HOUR: DC'S NOTORIOUS LGBT STREET GANG HAS A NEW AGENDA ? SECOND HOUR: GOING DOWN MEMORY LANE DC IN THE 60s, 70s, 80s January 2, 2018  -  FIRST HOUR:  DC'S NOTORIOUS LGBT STREET GANG HAS A NEW AGENDA ? SECOND HOUR:  GOING DOWN MEMORY LANE DC IN THE 60s, 70s, 80s JOIN OUR LIVE RADIO BREAKFAST SHOW! BEN'S CHILI BOWL 1213 U STREET, NW WASHINGTON, DC 10:00 AM - 12:00 NOON COME EARLY FOR BREAKFAST FIRST HOUR: DC'S NOTORIUS LGBT STREET GANG HAS A NEW AGENDA ? GUESTS: RONALD MOTEN INTERVENTION SPECIALIST STAR BENNETT CEO/FOUNDER "CHECK IT" SECOND HOUR: GOING DOWN MEMORY LANE DC IN THE 60s, 70s, 80s GUESTS: KENNY BROWN STEVE "FOOTS" BOLTON REV DR SANDRA BUTLER-TRUESDALE DC LEGENDARY MUSICIANS GUESTS ARE 4TH & 5TH GENERATION WASHINGTONIANS C0-HOST: ATTORNEY NKECHI TAIFA ADVOCACY DIRECTOR FOR CRIMINAL JUSTICE OPEN SOCIETY FOUNDATIONS
December 19, 2017 - FEMALES WHO HAVE MADE A DIFFERENCE IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE IN WASHINGTON, DCDecember 19, 2017 - FEMALES WHO HAVE MADE A DIFFERENCE IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE IN WASHINGTON, DCTHE GUESTS FOR CROSSROADS ON DECEMBER 19, 2017 WERE: ADRIENNE POTEAT, FORMER DEPUTY DIRECTOR, DC DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS; REV BETTY GREEN, FORMER CHAMPLAIN OF THE DC DEPARTMENT OF CORRECTIONS AND TYRONE PARKER, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF THE ALLIANCE OF CONCERNED MEN. Mertine Moore Brown's Commentary of crossroads on 12/19/2017. FEMALES WHO HAVE MADE A DIFFERENCE IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE IN WASHINGTON, DC DECEMBER 19, 2017 GRAPEVINE At least 86 people nationwide received federal prison sentences last year for distributing drugs resulting in death or serious injury, up 16 percent from 2012, says the US Sentencing Commission. An analysis of news reports found 1,200 mentions nationally of drug-death prosecutions in 2016, three times the number in 2011. Private prison staff are disproportionately women of color and receive “poor compensation” compared to employees of incarcerated state and federal populations according to a study published this month in the International Journal of Law, Crime and Justice. There were 23 executions in 2017. Guest Adrienne Poteat – In 1975, Adrienne was the first female correctional officer at Lorton, she has helped inmates in critical situations. “If you cannot respect inmates, corrections is not for you.” There were many programs then -` culinary, basic learning, family support. Today there are no substantial programs. Rev Betty Green would meet with inmates in the Chaplain’s Office. She started as Secretary to Leonard Wiggins. Her supervisor Elwood York asked her to take position. The Champlain’s Office is Central Control; a key function in DC Jail. Religion is essential. Inmates are baptized; they love the services. Margaret Quick, Rev Betty Green, Barbara Ridley and Adrienne Poteat are perfect recipients to receive the “Harriet Tubman Freedom Award”.
December 12, 2017 - DC POLICE REVIEW BOARD DETERMINE THAT SHOOTING DEATH OF TERRENCE STERLING BY COP WAS UNJUSTIFIEDDecember 12, 2017 - DC POLICE REVIEW BOARD DETERMINE THAT SHOOTING DEATH OF TERRENCE STERLING BY COP WAS UNJUSTIFIEDThe First half of the Radio Show Today was Entitled: DC POLICE REVIEW BOARD DETERMINE THAT SHOOTING DEATH OF TERRENCE STERLING BY COP WAS UNJUSTIFIED. THE GUEST was STEVEN DOUGLAS of STEVEN DOUGLAS MINISTRIES, The 2nd Half of the Radio Show featured DR BUFORD. INTERNATIONAL DENTISTRY, DENTAL SERVICES FOR FORMERLY INCARCERATED & XMAS GIFTS FOR THEIR CHILDREN. The show was very informative as usual and gave the listeners information that sparked a conversation. Roach Brown did it again, by having such a great show.
December 5, 2017 - BLACK LAW ENFORCEMENT & CRIMINAL JUSTICE ISSUESDecember 5, 2017 - BLACK LAW ENFORCEMENT &  CRIMINAL JUSTICE ISSUESJOIN OUR LIVE RADIO BREAKFAST SHOW! BEN'S CHILI BOWL 1213 U STREET, NW WASHINGTON, DC 10:00 AM - 12:00 NOON COME EARLY FOR BREAKFAST THE HOSTS FOR THE SHOW WAS NONE OTHER THAN ROACH BROWN AND THE CO-HOST WAS NKECHI TAIFA, ADVOCACY DIRECTOR FOR CRIMINAL JUSTICE OPEN SOCIETY FOUNDATIONS FIRST HOUR: BLACK LAW ENFORCEMENT & CRIMINAL JUSTICE ISSUES SECOND HOUR: "RETURNING CITIZENS" DOCUMENTARY GUESTS: CHARLES THORNTON BOARD CHAIRMAN CORRECTIONS INFORMATION COUNCIL AL TILLMAN EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR NO OPPORTUNITY WASTED COMMENTARY BY MERTINE MOORE BROWN - ASSOCIATE PRODUCER CROSS ROADS COMMENTARY – DECEMBER 5, 2017 BLACK LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL JUSTICE ISSUES “RETURNING CITIZENS” DOCUMENTARY HOSTS: Co-Host Attorney Nkechi Taifa, Advocacy Director for Criminal Justice Open Society Foundations Roach Brown, Criminal Justice Activist GUESTS: Dwayne Crawford, National Organization of Black Law Enforcement Executives Charles Thornton, Board Chairman, Corrections Information Council (CIC) Al Tillman, Executive Director, No Opportunity Wasted GRAPEVINE Over 18 Federal halfway houses have been closed nationwide. This prevents inmates not being released 6 months early. Why is this a bipartisan issue? Make calls to Congress. In Massachusetts, 6,000 drug cases have been tainted by drug labs and must be dismissed. A former chemist was high every day she worked at the state lab. In 2014 chemists were guilty of stealing drugs from state crime labs. More than 20,000 cases had to be tossed in April. Nationally, 3 inmates have been executed this year, one half more than last year. New bill in the House of Representatives can revoke your passport based upon mere suspicion of unscrupulous activity. New York State Assemblywoman cites the racial disparities with the opioid epidemic. African Americans were prosecuted and put in jail during the drug crisis of the 90s but now that the opioid crisis is affecting Caucasians, it’s now labeled a health issue to divert these persons from prison into treatment. We need a restorative justice package for all families. There is no funding for restoration justice. Charles Thornton, through his work with Corrections Information Council (CIC) is very instrumental in highlighting issues here and across the nation. His work, shown in the documentary produced by Saffron Cassidy, “Returning Citizens”, can be ordered on ITunes, Amazon and Hulu. There is a strong group of individuals in Washington, DC who are active in this Movement. The documentary follows Roach and others as they reintegrate into society. These men and women focus on finding a solution to the problem. Returning citizens Andrea James and Glenn Martin won the prestigious, and unprecedented, international Robert Kennedy Award for their work since they’ve returned to their communities. What message are we sending? What audience is affected? We must contact policy makers. The role of the formerly incarcerated? Public Safety is huge. One person doing positive things affects the whole community. We must be careful of the message we are giving to someone coming home after serving 15, 20 years. Many guys have turned their lives around. Roach and Charles recently went to Jessup, Maryland correctional center on a prison reentry seminar, most of whom are lifers, 200-300 guys. They must think outside the box. They must create their own life. Transformation was able to happen when Lorton was here. Guys were able to take advantage of furloughs and Pell grants at Federal City College (now the University of the District of Columbia) and George Washington University. There was lots of reform then. Programs were rehabilitative. 6 Magna Cum Laude at Federal City College were inmates from Lorton. You could attend your relative’s funeral. You could go to college. Today there is trauma. The Lorton Revitalization Act closed Lorton. Programs were abolished. The school to prison pipeline is real. Pre-schoolers are being handcuffed for throwing a spit ball, pulling a girl’s pigtails…..childhood pranks. This administration has consciously taken away what was created. Previously Incarcerated Persons (PIP) must come together. There are lots of allies, special interest groups. There are over 20 million PIPS. The Department of Corrections believed in Rehabilitation (local). The BOP (Bureau of Prisons - federal) believes in punishment. People are receiving 20, 30, 40 years. Al Tillman, Executive Director, No Opportunity Wasted, helps hard to employ become employed, assist with housing and transportation. His number is 301.316.2002. He specializes in returning citizens. Returning citizens must have determination and focus. There will be lots of nos. They must be given an opportunity. You could be the next victim if you are part of the problem and not the solution. GRAPEVINE US Coast Guard operates a secret floating prison, men are shackled to the deck, floating 2 weeks to months before brought to land. Foster care youth are more likely to be chronic offenders, according to a Canadian study. Walking While Black – Jacksonville, FLorida enforcement sheriff writes hundreds of pedestrian citations yearly, $65 tickets, can damage your credit if you don’t pay, your license can get suspended. Last 5 years blacks received 55% of the tickets; are 3 times more likely as whites to receive then. Dwayne Crawford is from Atlanta. He’s glad to be at Ben’s Chili Bowl. NOBLE was founded in Washington, DC in 1976, 40 years old. They are comprised of police chiefs, sheriffs, command staff, sergeants; highest ranking Black leadership. All races and gender are included. Their purpose: fairness and equality. Equal protection under the law. Black Identity Extremists – What Blacks have been labeled who stand for justice; akin to the tactics used against the Black Panther Party. That description needs to be removed. There are 18,000+ law enforcement agencies nationwide. If you feel injustice has occurred, file a complaint. Create a paper trail. “Community is police, police are community”. This is the 40TH anniversary of the DC Human rights Act. UPCOMING EVENT Roach Brown’s play, which was written in prison, will be shown. This DVD, “HOLIDAYS…HOLLOW DAYS” is a Xmas prison play by The Inner Voices, a group started in Lorton in the 1970s. First play, poem written in solitary confinement, expanded to “XMAS IN TIME”, rewritten for National Public Television. Had national tour with Richard Pryor and received 2 standing ovations at the world-famous Apollo Theater. President Ford commuted Roach’s life sentence on Xmas Day 1975. JUSTICE ROUNDTABLE, DECEMBER 21, 2017, NOON To register, JUSTICEROUNDTABLE.ORG, Click on EVENTS Roach will showcase his comedic humor Also being shown: UNION TEMPLE BAPTIST CHURCH 1213 W Street, SE THURSDAY, DECEMBER 21, 2017, 7 – 9PM HONORING 4 WOMEN INVOLVED IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE: MARGARET QUICK, BARBARA RIDLEY, REV BETTY GREEN AND ADRIAN POTEET, who recently won a hand dance competition at WPFW annual event.
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Washington Post Article:  Dr. Frances Cress Welsing

Washington Post Article: Dr. Frances Cress Welsing

The Washington Post

March 18, 2016

Memorial service to be held for celebrated, controversial Frances Cress Welsing.
Psychiatrist and author Frances Cress Welsing was known for her controversial views on race. (Elvert Barnes/elvertbarnes.com)
By Hamil R. Harris March 17 at 10:32 PM  
When family members, friends, and colleagues of Frances Cress Welsing began planning a memorial service for the psychiatrist and author who devoted her life to studying racism and its root causes, they knew they would have a tall order trying to capture her impact.

She was both celebrated and controversial, but never wavering in her belief that the persistent struggles of people of color were the results of the racism they had endured. Welsing died Jan. 2, a few hours after suffering a stroke. She was 80.
Welsing provided psychiatric services to D.C. government agencies and institutions for 27 years. She also maintained a private practice in the District beginning in 1967, counseling patients until days before her death.
Several of those she helped, such as motivational speaker and radio host Roach Brown, say they owe her their lives.
In 1965, Brown was a 21-year-old inmate at the D.C. Department of Correction’s prison in Lorton, Va. A year earlier, he and two other men had been charged with first-degree murder in the shooting death of a “local fence in a dispute over the price of hot jewelry,” Brown said.

[The price of redemption]

No weapon was ever recovered, and Brown, now 72, has always maintained that he was not the triggerman.
Welsing testified during his trial that his actions were consistent with someone whose environment had led to mental-health problems.
“They ended up giving me life in prison because Dr. Welsing spoke up on my behalf,” said Brown, who went on to start the prison theatrical group Inner Voices. “She saw something in me that I didn’t see in myself.”
Brown, who had his sentenced commuted in 1975, will be among those in attendance at the memorial service for Welsing on Saturday from 1 to 4 p.m. at Metropolitan AME Church in the District. “Dr. Welsing turned me and other guys around,” Brown said. “She was our Harriet Tubman to get out of mental slavery.”

Welsing first gained notoriety in 1969 after she wrote an essay, “The Cress Theory of Color Confrontation and Racism (White Supremacy).” In it she theorized that racism was rooted in the varying degrees of melanin and the “color inferiority” of white people. She argued that the lack of melanin led white people to develop “hostility and aggression” toward people darker than themselves.
 “She had a theory about race and why white people do what they do and I dealt with the what,” said Neely Fuller, author of “The United Independent Compensatory Code System Concept: a textbook/workbook for thought speech and/or action for victims of racism (white supremacy).”

In her 1991 book, “The Isis Papers: The Keys to the Colors,” Welsing again looked at the origins of white supremacy and its impact. She wrote that “black males must help one another to understand that they are being led by the dynamic of white supremacy to inflict extreme damage upon themselves and each other.”

[Welsing’s work provokes different reactions]

“Dr. Welsing’s major contribution as it relates to black mental health was that she had the capacity to challenge the dominant prevailing thought of our society and she gave it the name global white supremacy,” said Kevin Washington, president of the Association of Black Psychologists.

Ray Winbush, director of the Institute for Urban Research at Morgan State University and former director of the Race Relations Institute at Fisk University, said Welsing drew heavy criticism for her views, which she expected. She frequently engaged her detractors.

In 1974, she and Stanford University physicist William Shockley, who had argued that blacks were genetically inferior to whites, engaged in debate on the syndicated television show “Tony Brown’s Journal.”
Welsing was born in Chicago in 1935.Her father, Henry N. Cress was a physician, and her mother, Ida Mae Griffen, was a school teacher, and there were high expectations.
“We were taught that we were special,” said Welsing’s older sister, Lorne Cress-Love. “We were encouraged to read and discuss all types of issues.”

Cress-Love said their father and their grandfather, who also was a physician, were passionate about fighting for equality. “My father told us that our grandfather spent more time fighting for the race than practicing medicine.”
In 1957, Welsing earned a bachelor’s degree from Antioch College and in 1962 she earned a medical degree from the Howard University College of Medicine. After graduation, Welsing completed a residency at St. Elizabeths Hospital in Washington. From 1968 to 1975, she taught in the pediatric department of Howard University’s Medical School.
 
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